The Trevelyon Miscellany: Astronomy

Word & Image:
The Trevelyon Miscellany of 1608

on exhibit January 23 - May 22, 2004

Astronomy

Early modern astronomers believed there were seven planets in addition to Earth: Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, the Sun, Venus, Mercury, and the Moon. These planets, along with four outer "heavenly" spheres, formed eleven concentric orbs surrounding the Earth. Since celestial motion was thought to exert an influence on health, human behavior, weather and other natural events, commoners and kings alike sought the advice of astrologers and consulted almanacs. Trevelyon's section on astronomy is taken directly from Leonard Digges's A Prognostication Everlasting, published frequently between 1555 and 1605.

Thomas Trevelyon, Miscellany, fol. 21r (The true proportion of all the Planets)

Thomas Trevelyon
Miscellany, fol. 21r
("The true proportion of all the Planets")

Leonard Digges (d. 1571?), A prognostication Everlasting, London, 1556

Leonard Digges (d. 1571?)
A prognostication everlasting
London, 1556

Leonard Digges (d. 1571?), A prognostication Everlasting, London, 1556

Leonard Digges (d. 1571?)
A prognostication everlasting
London, 1556

Thomas Trevelyon, Miscellany, fol. 22v (The natuere, course, colour, and placing of these seven Planets)

Thomas Trevelyon
Miscellany, fol. 22v
("The natuere, course, colour, and placing of these seven Planets")

Word and Image: The Trevelyon Miscellany of 1608
Exhibition Highlights

Thomas Trevelyon: the man and his sources | History and Religion | Calendars and Calculations | Memento Mori | Proverbs | The Old Testament | Lettering | A Quest for Order | Women | Astronomy | Personifications | Embroidery

Exhibition Intro | Visiting the Folger



This page updated March 26, 2004