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Translating the Chinese classic 'The Peony Pavilion' with a 'Shakespearean flavor'
The Peony Pavilion
Shakespeare and Beyond

Translating the Chinese classic 'The Peony Pavilion' with a 'Shakespearean flavor'

Posted
Author
Esther French

The Peony Pavilion. “Kunqu performance at Peking University.” Wikimedia Commons / Antonis SHEN / CC BY-SA 2.0 Could Chinese literature be more popular with English-speaking audiences if translators favored words, phrases and poetic forms that spark associations with Shakespeare? This…

Thomas Nashe: A dominant literary voice in Elizabethan England
Thomas Nashe
Shakespeare and Beyond

Thomas Nashe: A dominant literary voice in Elizabethan England

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Author
Andrew Hadfield Jennifer Richards

We are used to thinking of Elizabethan (and Jacobean) literature with Shakespeare at the center, but evidence suggests that, although Shakespeare was considered an important writer in the last decade of the queen’s reign, Thomas Nashe was one of the…

Shining a light on the other playwrights of Shakespeare's day
The Roaring Girl
Shakespeare and Beyond

Shining a light on the other playwrights of Shakespeare's day

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Author
Esther Ferington

A Digital Anthology of Early Modern English Drama (EMED, for short) is a large, searchable digital resource on the hundreds of commercial plays by the other authors of Shakespeare’s time—including dozens of newly edited play texts.

What happens when actors, musicians, and scholars collaborate on a Restoration Shakespeare play
Shakespeare and Beyond

What happens when actors, musicians, and scholars collaborate on a Restoration Shakespeare play

Posted
Author
Richard Schoch

Participants watch as directors Amanda Eubanks Winkler and Richard Schoch give preliminary stagings to the actors and dancers, for Gildon’s 1700 adaptation of “Measure for Measure.” Part of the November 2014 Folger Institute weekend workshop, “Performing Restoration Shakespeare.” Part of…