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Measure for Measure

Play on! Q&A: Aditi Kapil on translating 'Measure for Measure'
At the June 2019 reading of the Measure for Measure translation
Shakespeare & Beyond

Play on! Q&A: Aditi Kapil on translating 'Measure for Measure'

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Shakespeare & Beyond

In choosing which Shakespeare play to translate for the Play on! project, playwright Aditi Brennan Kapil let herself be influenced by dramaturg Liz Engelman, who was attracted to the themes of Measure for Measure and their resonance in today’s world.…

When words fail: A possible interpretation of Isabella's silence in Measure for Measure
Isabella and the Duke in Measure for Measure
Shakespeare & Beyond

When words fail: A possible interpretation of Isabella's silence in Measure for Measure

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Leandra Lynn
"Measure for Measure" is technically a comedy, which means it ends with a marriage. So why does Isabella respond to the Duke's proposal with silence?
What happens when actors, musicians, and scholars collaborate on a Restoration Shakespeare play
Shakespeare & Beyond

What happens when actors, musicians, and scholars collaborate on a Restoration Shakespeare play

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Richard Schoch

Participants watch as directors Amanda Eubanks Winkler and Richard Schoch give preliminary stagings to the actors and dancers, for Gildon’s 1700 adaptation of “Measure for Measure.” Part of the November 2014 Folger Institute weekend workshop, “Performing Restoration Shakespeare.” Part of…

Measure for Measure + Dido and Aeneas: A Shakespeare-opera mash-up from 1699 takes the stage
Shakespeare & Beyond

Measure for Measure + Dido and Aeneas: A Shakespeare-opera mash-up from 1699 takes the stage

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Shakespeare & Beyond

Sometimes characterized as a “problem play,” Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure was first performed in the early 1600’s and was printed in the 1623 First Folio where it is listed as a comedy. During the Restoration, many of Shakespeare’s plays were adapted to suit the times, and…

Happier without men? Shakespeare and Cervantes’ heroines, religious life, married life, and country life
Shakespeare & Beyond

Happier without men? Shakespeare and Cervantes’ heroines, religious life, married life, and country life

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Kathryn Swanton

Connan Morrissey (Hermione) and Laura C. Harris (Perdita) embrace at the end of The Winter’s Tale, directed by Blake Robison, Folger Theatre, 2009. Carol Pratt. Shakespeare’s heroines often end up with husbands who don’t seem good enough for them, while…