Skip to main content
Back to main page

King John - Act 4, scene 1

Cite

Navigate this work

King John - Act 4, scene 1
Jump to

Act 4, scene 1

Scene 1

Synopsis:

Hubert prepares to put out Arthur’s eyes with hot irons. Arthur begs him to show mercy. Hubert plans to tell John that Arthur is dead.

Enter Hubert and Executioners, with irons and rope.

HUBERT 
1553  Heat me these irons hot, and look thou stand
1554  Within the arras. When I strike my foot
1555  Upon the bosom of the ground, rush forth
1556  And bind the boy which you shall find with me
1557 5 Fast to the chair. Be heedful. Hence, and watch.
EXECUTIONER 
1558  I hope your warrant will bear out the deed.
HUBERT 
1559  Uncleanly scruples fear not you. Look to ’t.
Executioners exit.
1560  Young lad, come forth. I have to say with you.

Enter Arthur.

ARTHUR 
1561  Good morrow, Hubert.
HUBERT  1562 10 Good morrow, little prince.
ARTHUR 
1563  As little prince, having so great a title
1564  To be more prince, as may be. You are sad.
HUBERT 
1565  Indeed, I have been merrier.
ARTHUR  1566  Mercy on me!
p. 127
1567 15 Methinks nobody should be sad but I.
1568  Yet I remember, when I was in France,
1569  Young gentlemen would be as sad as night
1570  Only for wantonness. By my christendom,
1571  So I were out of prison and kept sheep,
1572 20 I should be as merry as the day is long.
1573  And so I would be here but that I doubt
1574  My uncle practices more harm to me.
1575  He is afraid of me, and I of him.
1576  Is it my fault that I was Geoffrey’s son?
1577 25 No, indeed, is ’t not. And I would to heaven
1578  I were your son, so you would love me, Hubert.
HUBERTaside 
1579  If I talk to him, with his innocent prate
1580  He will awake my mercy, which lies dead.
1581  Therefore I will be sudden and dispatch.
ARTHUR 
1582 30 Are you sick, Hubert? You look pale today.
1583  In sooth, I would you were a little sick
1584  That I might sit all night and watch with you.
1585  I warrant I love you more than you do me.
HUBERTaside 
1586  His words do take possession of my bosom.
He shows Arthur a paper.
1587 35 Read here, young Arthur. (Aside.) How now,
1588  foolish rheum?
1589  Turning dispiteous torture out of door?
1590  I must be brief lest resolution drop
1591  Out at mine eyes in tender womanish tears.—
1592 40 Can you not read it? Is it not fair writ?
ARTHUR 
1593  Too fairly, Hubert, for so foul effect.
1594  Must you with hot irons burn out both mine eyes?
HUBERT 
1595  Young boy, I must.
p. 129
ARTHUR  1596  And will you?
HUBERT  1597 45 And I will.
ARTHUR 
1598  Have you the heart? When your head did but ache,
1599  I knit my handkercher about your brows—
1600  The best I had, a princess wrought it me—
1601  And I did never ask it you again;
1602 50 And with my hand at midnight held your head,
1603  And like the watchful minutes to the hour
1604  Still and anon cheered up the heavy time,
1605  Saying “What lack you?” and “Where lies your
1606  grief?”
1607 55 Or “What good love may I perform for you?”
1608  Many a poor man’s son would have lien still
1609  And ne’er have spoke a loving word to you;
1610  But you at your sick service had a prince.
1611  Nay, you may think my love was crafty love,
1612 60 And call it cunning. Do, an if you will.
1613  If heaven be pleased that you must use me ill,
1614  Why then you must. Will you put out mine eyes—
1615  These eyes that never did nor never shall
1616  So much as frown on you?
HUBERT  1617 65 I have sworn to do it.
1618  And with hot irons must I burn them out.
ARTHUR 
1619  Ah, none but in this Iron Age would do it.
1620  The iron of itself, though heat red-hot,
1621  Approaching near these eyes, would drink my tears
1622 70 And quench this fiery indignation
1623  Even in the matter of mine innocence;
1624  Nay, after that, consume away in rust
1625  But for containing fire to harm mine eye.
1626  Are you more stubborn-hard than hammered iron?
1627 75 An if an angel should have come to me
1628  And told me Hubert should put out mine eyes,
p. 131
1629  I would not have believed him. No tongue but
1630  Hubert’s.
HUBERT stamps his foot and calls  1631 Come forth.

Enter Executioners with ropes, a heated iron, and a
brazier of burning coals.


1632 80 Do as I bid you do.
ARTHUR 
1633  O, save me, Hubert, save me! My eyes are out
1634  Even with the fierce looks of these bloody men.
HUBERT 
1635  Give me the iron, I say, and bind him here.
He takes the iron.
ARTHUR 
1636  Alas, what need you be so boist’rous-rough?
1637 85 I will not struggle; I will stand stone-still.
1638  For God’s sake, Hubert, let me not be bound!
1639  Nay, hear me, Hubert! Drive these men away,
1640  And I will sit as quiet as a lamb.
1641  I will not stir nor wince nor speak a word
1642 90 Nor look upon the iron angerly.
1643  Thrust but these men away, and I’ll forgive you,
1644  Whatever torment you do put me to.
HUBERTto Executioners 
1645  Go stand within. Let me alone with him.
EXECUTIONER 
1646  I am best pleased to be from such a deed.
Executioners exit.
ARTHUR 
1647 95 Alas, I then have chid away my friend!
1648  He hath a stern look but a gentle heart.
1649  Let him come back, that his compassion may
1650  Give life to yours.
HUBERT  1651  Come, boy, prepare yourself.
ARTHUR 
1652 100 Is there no remedy?
p. 133
HUBERT  1653  None but to lose your eyes.
ARTHUR 
1654  God, that there were but a mote in yours,
1655  A grain, a dust, a gnat, a wandering hair,
1656  Any annoyance in that precious sense.
1657 105 Then, feeling what small things are boisterous
1658  there,
1659  Your vile intent must needs seem horrible.
HUBERT 
1660  Is this your promise? Go to, hold your tongue.
ARTHUR 
1661  Hubert, the utterance of a brace of tongues
1662 110 Must needs want pleading for a pair of eyes.
1663  Let me not hold my tongue. Let me not, Hubert,
1664  Or, Hubert, if you will, cut out my tongue,
1665  So I may keep mine eyes. O, spare mine eyes,
1666  Though to no use but still to look on you.
He seizes the iron.
1667 115 Lo, by my troth, the instrument is cold,
1668  And would not harm me.
HUBERTtaking back the iron 
1669  I can heat it, boy.
ARTHUR 
1670  No, in good sooth. The fire is dead with grief,
1671  Being create for comfort, to be used
1672 120 In undeserved extremes. See else yourself.
1673  There is no malice in this burning coal.
1674  The breath of heaven hath blown his spirit out
1675  And strewed repentant ashes on his head.
HUBERT 
1676  But with my breath I can revive it, boy.
ARTHUR 
1677 125 An if you do, you will but make it blush
1678  And glow with shame of your proceedings, Hubert.
1679  Nay, it perchance will sparkle in your eyes,
p. 135
1680  And, like a dog that is compelled to fight,
1681  Snatch at his master that doth tar him on.
1682 130 All things that you should use to do me wrong
1683  Deny their office. Only you do lack
1684  That mercy which fierce fire and iron extends,
1685  Creatures of note for mercy-lacking uses.
HUBERT 
1686  Well, see to live. I will not touch thine eye
1687 135 For all the treasure that thine uncle owes.
1688  Yet am I sworn, and I did purpose, boy,
1689  With this same very iron to burn them out.
ARTHUR 
1690  O, now you look like Hubert. All this while
1691  You were disguisèd.
HUBERT  1692 140 Peace. No more. Adieu.
1693  Your uncle must not know but you are dead.
1694  I’ll fill these doggèd spies with false reports.
1695  And, pretty child, sleep doubtless and secure
1696  That Hubert, for the wealth of all the world,
1697 145 Will not offend thee.
ARTHUR  1698  O heaven! I thank you, Hubert.
HUBERT 
1699  Silence. No more. Go closely in with me.
1700  Much danger do I undergo for thee.
They exit.